Geiger Readings for Apr 18, 2018

Latitude 47.704656 Longitude -122.318745
Ambient office  = 69 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ambient outside = 93 nanosieverts per hour
 
Soil exposed to rain water = 94 nanosieverts per hour
 
Garlic bulb from Central Market = 82 nanosieverts per hour
 
Tap water = 103 nanosieverts per hour
 
Filter water = 97 nanosieverts per hour
 

Nuclear Weapons 354 - Prominent Russian Military Man Says That Nuclear War Between The U.S. and Russia Is Inevitable

       The world has lived under the threat of all-out nuclear war for sixty years. At the height of the Cold War, the U.S. and the Soviet Union each had tens of thousands of nuclear warheads. Now the U.S. and Russia have under five thousand warheads each thanks to disarmament treaties.

       Studies of the effects of nuclear detonations on the atmosphere have led to the idea of nuclear winter where there is so much smoke and dust in the atmosphere that sunlight is blocked, plants cannot grow and billions of people will die. It has been estimated that only one hundred nuclear warhead detonations would be enough to destroy human civilization. This means that seven nuclear armed countries could bring the end of humanity if they launched their nuclear arsenal.

       The Bulletin on the Atomic Scientists has the Doomsday Clock which basically shows a graphic representation of the probability of World War III fought with nuclear weapons. For awhile after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, it was believed that the world could pull back from the possibility of nuclear war but recently, cooling relations between some nuclear power suggest that we are still in danger.

       Evgeny Buzhinskiy, a former Lieutenant-General under the Soviet Union is now concerned that nuclear war is inevitable. Buzhinskiy was with Russia’s General Staff for sixteen years. He said that because Russia is “lagging behind” the U.S. in terms of military power, Putin would start using tactical nuclear weapons if Russia were losing a conventional ground war other nations. The use of tactical nuclear weapons could easily escalate into the use of strategic nuclear weapons. Because he believes that a confrontation between the U.S. and Russia is inevitable, he believes that the use of nuclear weapons is also inevitable. With the use of chemical weapons in Syria by the Assad regime, the chances of conflict between the U.S. and Russia in the war-torn country are rising.

        In an interview with a U.K. news presenter, Buzhinskiy said, “I think it’s worse than the Cold War, which we have been waging for 40 years after the Second World War. In the Cold War time I was in the armed forces and I was quite comfortable I’d say. There were definite duels and definite red lines – everybody knew what to do. There were no threats, no sanctions, no isolation, no cornering, no nothing. There was just ideological confrontation, but people on both sides knew how far they could go.”

       When the new presenter asked if he was serious or just trying to scare people, Buzhinskiy said “I am scared myself, because I have children and grandchildren, so I’m scared for their fate.” He pointed out that there are thousands of Russian advisors in Syria and that, if any Russians die because of actions by U.S. forces, Russia will retaliate.

       The Russian Foreign Minister said that relations between the U.S. and Russia are worse than the Cold War. He went on to say that the normal channels of communication between the U.S., the U.K., NATO and the European Union that were intended to prevent confrontation have been shut down.

Evgeny Buzhinskiy:

 

 

Geiger Readings for Apr 17, 2018

Latitude 47.704656 Longitude -122.318745
Ambient office  = 96 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ambient outside = 117 nanosieverts per hour
 
Soil exposed to rain water = 113 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ginger root from Central Market = 113 nanosieverts per hour
 
Tap water = 147 nanosieverts per hour
 
Filter water = 139 nanosieverts per hour
 

Nuclear Reactors 554 - Russian Duma Considering A Bill To Cut Off Nuclear Trade With U.S. Companies

       Last year, Congress passed a tough sanctions bill against Russia and Russian oligarchs in retaliation for their interference in our 2016 elections. The Trump administration refused to implement the sanctions until the political pressure made them impossible to ignore. On April 6, Trump finally implemented the sanctions on twenty-four government officials and powerful Russian businessmen.

      The State Duma, the lower house of the Russian legislature, is now considering the draft of a bill to ban all trade between Rosatom, the Russian state-owned nuclear monopoly and all U.S. nuclear power companies. The bill was submitted jointly by several of the factions in the Duma and Vyacheslave Volodin who is the chairman of the Duma. It could be debated and might be adopted in the next Duma session this week.

       Beginning in 2016, Volodin has been the personal target of sanctions. He is a member of President Putin’s inner circle. His assets in the U.S. were frozen in reaction to the Russian annexation of the Crimean Peninsula. The European Union also hit him with travel-restriction and sanctions.

       In addition to the stopping of trade with the U.S. nuclear power industry, the bill would also impose restrictions on software, hardware, pharmaceutical and farm products exported from the U.S. to Russia. The U.S. would also be prohibited from joining in the privatization of Russian state-owned assets. In addition, the bill sets up similar restrictions that would be imposed on any other countries who followed the U.S. lead in sanctions against Russia and Russians.

       Rosatom currently has multiple projects with companies in the U.S. TVEL is Rosatom’s nuclear fuel division. In April of 2016, TVEL signed a contract to deliver test batches of its TVS-K fuel rod assemblies to pressurized power reactors in the U.S. starting in 2019.

       It is unclear just how damaging such a freeze of nuclear trade would be. The most important nuclear exchange between the U.S. and Russia was the Megatons to Megawatts program which ended in 2013. This exchange agreement was signed between the U.S. and Russia in 1993, shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The U.S. purchased low-enriched uranium from Russia which was created by diluting highly-enriched weapons grade uranium which was in excess of what Russia needed for their nuclear weapons program.

      The Megatons to Megawatts program ultimately converted five hundred tons of weapons grade uranium into fifteen thousand tons of nuclear fuel grade uranium for use in U.S. nuclear power reactors. This program was called the greatest disarmament program in the history of the world. We got cheap nuclear fuel to burn in our reactors and Russia made a seventeen billion dollar profit.

       After the ascension of Vladimir Putin to the presidency of Russia, Rosatom began to complain that the Megatons to Megawatts program was forcing Russia to sell their uranium fuel to the U.S. at a price below other sources of uranium fuel. After 2013, Rosatom wanted to sign nuclear fuel import contracts with the U.S. for uranium that would be priced at the current level of world nuclear fuel prices.

Russian Duma:

 

Geiger Readings for Apr 16, 2018

Latitude 47.704656 Longitude -122.318745
Ambient office  = 122 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ambient outside = 122 nanosieverts per hour
 
Soil exposed to rain water = 121 nanosieverts per hour
 
Beefsteak tomato from Central Market = 63 nanosieverts per hour
 
Tap water = 93 nanosieverts per hour
 
Filter water = 70 nanosieverts per hour
 

Geiger Readings for Apr 15, 2018

Latitude 47.704656 Longitude -122.318745
Ambient office  = 45 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ambient outside = 100 nanosieverts per hour
 
Soil exposed to rain water = 101 nanosieverts per hour
 
Avocado from Central Market = 138 nanosieverts per hour
 
Tap water =80 nanosieverts per hour
 
Filter water = 73 nanosieverts per hour
 

Geiger Readings for Apr 14, 2018

Latitude 47.704656 Longitude -122.318745
Ambient office  = 100 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ambient outside = 80 nanosieverts per hour
 
Soil exposed to rain water = 82 nanosieverts per hour
 
Crimini mushroom from Central Market = 114 nanosieverts per hour
 
Tap water = 102 nanosieverts per hour
 
Filter water = 97 nanosieverts per hour
 
Dover sole - Caught in USA = 93 nanosieverts per hour
 

Radioactive Waste 337 - French Develop New Process To Decontaminate Soil

       There are many sites around the world contaminated by radioactive materials. Some sites such as the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State were dedicated to nuclear weapons production and little regard was given to safely disposing of radioactive materials. Some sites such as the Nevada Test Site were used to test nuclear weapons before a treaty banned above ground and atmospheric tests. Some sites such as Fukushima were contaminated by accidents at nuclear power plants. There are millions of tons of soil around the world contaminated by radioactive materials that can threaten the environment and public health.

       Last November, Japan’s Fukushima Prefecture and France’s Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) carried out a successful test of a new process for decontaminating radioactive soil.

       The French Demeterres project was launched in 2013 for the purpose of developing bio- and eco-technology that could decontaminated soil and effluents for post-nuclear accident remediation. Twenty-three million dollars was allocated for the five-year project involving CEA, Orano, Veolia, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), the National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), and the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD).

       One of the physiochemical processes that was developed by the Demeterres project utilizes particulate floatation foams. Soil contaminated with cesium is mixed with water to create a suspension. This mixture is injected into the middle of a floatation column. Air is pumped into the bottom of the floatation column to create bubbles. The contaminated soil particles adhere to the surface of the bubbles of air which rise to the surface of the column. Uncontaminated soil particles sink to the bottom of the column. The first test of the system took place in 2016 when uncontaminated soil was run through the column to gather data on the process.

       After the March 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, about twenty-nine million cubic yards of soil were removed. They wanted evacuees to be able to move back into their homes as quickly as possible. The contaminated soil was placed in huge storage bags and stored at several dedicated sites. The Japanese government is looking for the best way to reduce or remove the radioactivity in the soil.

        In April of 2017, Japan's Ministry of the Environment put out a call for demonstrations of decontamination techniques. The froth floatation process was one of ten techniques that were selected for demonstration out of a total of nineteen submissions.

        The froth floatation process was tested on about six hundred pounds of contaminated soil at Okuma in Fukushima Prefecture between November 13 and November 17 of 2017. The radioactivity of the soil samples was cut to between one third and one half of the original contamination level. As a result of the tests, pretreatment of soil through drying, crumbling, pre-sifting and/or dispersion in water were suggested to improve the process.

       A spokesperson for CEA said, “If the technology presented is selected by the Japanese authorities, the next stage will be to develop the process on a larger scale so that it can be used in the Japanese municipalities that house storage centers.”

 

Geiger Readings for Apr 13, 2018

Latitude 47.704656 Longitude -122.318745
Ambient office  = 100 nanosieverts per hour
 
Ambient outside = 111 nanosieverts per hour
 
Soil exposed to rain water = 105 nanosieverts per hour
 
Carrot from Central Market = 121 nanosieverts per hour
 
Tap water = 121 nanosieverts per hour
 
Filter water = 106 nanosieverts per hour